Today we are getting a little child home. A one-year-old girl that has some serious medical conditions from Cincinnati Children’s to Albany New York today. My life used to be, I was all about building things. I was a mason contractor. I started flying when I was 18 years old. Before I started flying patients, I was always looking for a reason to go somewhere. There’s no better purpose to get in your plane and take someone to a place where they can get better. We fly over 500 flights a year, and I’m usually doing over a flight a day. It’s just really special to be a part of someone’s fight to survive. We make it so simple for them. We walk out of the airport, within five to ten minutes, we’re in the air. Typically, our flight could be completed before someone could even get through security, if they were well enough to go on a commercial flight,
Typically, our flight could be completed before someone could even get through security, if they were well enough to go on a commercial flight, board a plane, and de-board, In that time it takes to do that, we could have them where they need their care. If we don’t take them, they’re not getting the organs. They’re not getting their heart. They’re not getting their lungs. They don’t let the patient drive. They don’t let the patient take any kind of public transportation. I mean, there’s other air lift services that will take people, but they’re going to charge you 15 thousand. They’re going to charge you 20 thousand. With us, we don’t accept any money. We’re taking them wherever they need to go. We’ll take them for their transplant. We’ll take them for their pre-op visits. We’ll take them for their post-op visits. We’ll get them in the middle of the night and it’s all done with volunteers and it’s all free. We fly so many people with cancer, that are told nothing could be done for them. So we are there, giving them hope. It was the end of a busy week. It was like my 18th flight. It was a Friday. I was so excited to bring Lucas home. He had liver cancer. And they thought they got everything out. He’s not even going to need chemo. When I got to Boston, and his mom, Missy, we made eye contact, immediately she broke down. I didn’t get the text from her husband saying that they did scans and there’s not much they can do. He’s got two months to live. I just remember breaking down and I talked to my wife, and she says, what are you getting upset about. She said, get your act together, you have to fly the plane. I said, well, I was planning at the end of my week, bringing a healthy kid home. And ya know, that was a hard one. Yeah. That was a tough one. It’s sad when someone passes, but there’s so many more happy stories. I always say I have a lot of co-pilots on the plane. I call them my angel co-pilots. I can go on and on about things that have happened that you can’t explain. Flights we’ve done where we shouldn’t have been able to done, I shouldn’t have been able to do it, and weather shouldn’t have been right, and things work out so,
I shouldn’t have been able to do it, and weather shouldn’t have been right, and things work out so, it made me a believer.