Hello everyone, this is Andrew from Crown Academy of English and today
we are going to be doing a grammar lesson and we are going to look at the
difference between the word all and every… so people very often get confused between
those two words so we’re going to look at the
differences between the words and when do we use “all” ? And when do we use “every” ? Let’s get started!
So on this photograph we can see there are three ducks. Three yellow ducks. This duck is yellow, the first one. The second one is yellow. The third one is yellow. So we can say all of the ducks are yellow. All of the ducks are yellow. The word “of” is inside brackets because the word “of” is optional. So we can either say all the ducks are yellow, or all OF the ducks are yellow. It’s the same. We can also say…. we can also use the word “every”. Every
duck is yellow, every duck is yellow. So both of these sentences are correct and both of them mean the same thing. So the meaning is the
same…. okay. So you have a choice in this instance of either saying “all” or “every”. Now… there is a rule of the grammar structure of when we use the
word “all”…… and if you can see it you can see the
word all…..after it, the word duck, is in plural, so when we use the word “all”, the noun must go into the plural okay… and because the noun here… because ducks is now plural, the verb is also plural. So this is the verb “to be” in the ….. let me just think …. the third
person plural. so “are”. And when we use the word “every”…. “every” uses the singular form of the noun, so every duck and because duck is singular, then the verb is singular as well. So this is the … third-person singular of the verb “to be”. So this is the rule – when we use the word “all”, we must use the plural afterwards and when we
use the word “every”, the noun must go in the singular form. Let’s look at
two more examples: So here are some chocolate cakes. This cake is made
of chocolate, this cake is made of chocolate, this
cake is made of chocolate… so we can say all of the cakes are chocolate cakes. So “all” followed by the plural…. cakes are chocolate cakes. And we can also say the same meaning but a different way of
saying it, we can use the word “every” and we say every cake is a chocolate cake… so every and cake in singular form is a chocolate cake. So both of those
sentences mean the same thing. And the last example: Here we have a child who looks happy, and this child is happy, this child is happy so here we say all of the children are happy… and remember that “child” is an irregular noun and in the plural …. the plural of child is children. So we have “all”, followed by the children which is plural and we
say they ARE happy. And if we want to use the word “every”,
again we use “every” + singular so every child is happy. So the most important thing
to remember is… “all” plus plural and “every” plus singular. Now there are just another couple of
exceptions… we cannot always use all and every for the same uses. Sometimes we can only use the word “all” and one example is if we want to use a possessive pronoun, then we can only used the word “all” – we
cannot use the word… (excuse me!) we cannot use the word “every” So, what is a possessive pronoun? Well here they are – the possessive
pronouns are words like: my, your, his, her, its, our and their. So these possessive pronouns are used to indicate possession…. that somebody owns something… and if we want to use one of these words in our sentence, then we must only use the word “all” – We cannot use the word “every” …. so … if we want to use a possessive pronoun, it is okay to use the word “all”. So we can
say “all” and then a possessive pronoun… ..that is OK but we cannot use the word every – that is wrong. Example: So here we can see there are some
tablets, some medication… okay so the tablets are brown in colour… and if we want to use the word “your”… if
we want to say that they are your tablets, we must use the word “all” so we can say all of your tablets are brown. That is correct, but we must not say every your tablets… so if we use the word “your”, then “every” is wrong. We cannot say every. This is wrong and that is wrong. So even plural or singular, they are both wrong… okay… do not use “every” with any of these possessive pronouns. Another example… here we have some sweets and they are all in like a heart shape… so … we would say all of their sweets, so if the sweets belong to them,
third person plural, that is okay we can say all of their sweets our hearts, but we must not use the word every because
this is a possessive pronoun and we must not use “every” with
possessive pronouns. so “every their..” is wrong. Now similar, if we want to use something
called a “demonstrative”, we can only use the word “all”. So, what is a demonstrative? Well in
English these are words like .. well … the singular would be “this” and “that” and in the plural, it is “these” and “those”. Now for this lesson, we are only interested in the plural because “all” and “every” ….. are only referring to nouns in the plural. So, this lesson we’re just looking at the
words these and those. So the rule is similar to possessive
pronouns – If we want to use the word “these” and “those”, then we can only use “all”. We must not use “every”. So “all” followed by these and those is correct but we must not use “every”. Every…. we cannot say “every these” or “every those”.
That is wrong. Example – So we have some eggs. The eggs are fresh… and so we can say all of these eggs are fresh. That is fine, that is
OK but “every these eggs are fresh” is wrong …so we cannot use “every”. We cannot use “every” with these.
We can only use “all”. So “every these eggs is fresh” is wrong as well. The
singular or plural. Both of them are wrong. Example 2 – So we have some nice-looking oranges … and I think
these oranges come from Spain. We all know Spain grows the nicest
oranges 🙂 and so we can say all of those oranges are from Spain. That is OK, that is
correct. But we cannot say “every those oranges”, that is wrong because it’s the word “every”. So the conclusion here is if we want to use
the word “these” or “those” in our sentence, then we must used the word “all”. okay? all + uncountable nouns… well what is an uncountable noun? Well …. the definition looks complicated but it is actually
quite simple – An uncountable noun is something that we cannot separate into different parts. We cannot count them and the best is if I give you an example. For example, the word “milk” – We do not say one milk, two milks, three milks – we just say “milk”. It is a word that only exists in the
singular form – the same for “music” It is a general word that only exists in the singular – We do not say one music, two musics, three musics… we just say “music”… ok? And so when we want to use these words, we can only use…again… we must only
used the word “all” – we cannot say “every”. We cannot say “every furniture”, “every
music”, “every milk” So we must use “all”, we must not use “every”. Example – Stephen likes rock music, Stephen likes jazz music, and Stephen also likes classical music so we can say Stephen likes all music. So this is the uncountable noun, and notice this time the word stays in the singular… okay… and we do not use the
word “the” so there is no article… there is no definite article. We say the word “all” and then the uncountable noun which always stays in the singular. So this is wrong. We must not say “Steven
likes every music”. That is just nonsense. That does not make any sense. It doesn’t mean
anything and grammatically it is wrong. So just to remember, if it is an
uncountable noun, you can only use the word “all”. And there is another meaning of the word … “all”, and it means “the whole of..” Let me give you an example what we mean. So here we can see there is a cake okay… now imagine that somebody eats this slice of the cake and then he eats another slice of the cake, and then he
eats this slice of the cake, and then he eats the last slice of the cake. So we can say “my friends ate all of the cake”. So “all” here means everything – the whole of the cake. It’s another way of saying “the whole of…” ok… so my friends ate all of the cake…. and in this context, emy friends ate every cake” is is wrong – in this example … because this sentence means that there are several cakes but there isn’t, there aren’t several cakes.
There is one single cake, so this is wrong ok? We must say “my friends ate all of the cake”
It means the whole of the cake. However, instead of talking about the cake itself, if we talk about a slice of the cake, then yes, we can now say “my friends ate all the slices of the cake. And in this case, then we use the word “all” and then the plural… like we saw at the beginning. And if we are talking about slices of the cake, then yes it is ok, in that case to use the word “every”. We can then say “my friends ate every slice of the cake”. So this is an
example of what we saw at the beginning of
the lesson. So “every”, followed by a singular noun. Finally a very common use of the word “all” and “every” is when we’re
talking about time and duration… okay … and regular events. So, for example, if we are talking about ….. I …. wake up in the morning … and I start work at 6 o’clock, for example, so I start work early in the morning and
I work until the night…. so I start work in the morning, I finish working at night, we can say “Yesterday, I worked all day.” So “all day” means …. this is a duration. It means I started at the beginning of the day, and I
finished at the end of the day. So we used the
word “all” followed by ….. a time expression… and it means a duration: of time. So “all” followed by day, it means I worked and I started at the beginning
of the day and I finished at the end of the day.
It’s a duration. Now, on the other example, we can say, for
example, last week I worked on Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. So we can say “Last week, I worked EVERY day”. So can you see the difference? So “every” followed by “day”. This is referring to a regular event a
regular event in time. Okay so there’s a difference between “all day” and “every day” … and that is the
difference. So examples … of words we can say here – We can say “all
week” and that would mean we start on Monday and we finish on Sunday. You can say “all month”, “all morning”, “all year” … and the same for “every”. We can say “every week”, “every month”, “every morning”, “every year”. So this is a regular event that is repeated over time … and this is a duration. So we are now going to test your knowledge. We’re going to do an exercise so I want
you to fill in the gaps. You have to decide if the answer is “all” or “every”. So for example – There’s a flight from Paris
to London… something ..day. So what is the correct word? Should we
say “all” or “every”? What do you think? Well the answer is “every” We are talking about something that’s happening regularly and
so we say “every day”. Okay so now, there are going to be seven questions and you will see the question, and then there will be 10 seconds before the answer appears on the screen. So if you need more than 10 seconds, just press PAUSE on the video. Okay, so get ready, you need, probably
might need a pen or paper ….. get ready .. question 1 So the weather is very hot. All the animals are in the water. So this is an example of what we saw at the
beginning. When we used the word “all”, it is followed
by a noun in the plural. Question two…. Yesterday, the neighbor’s dog barked all day. So again, this is a duration – We’re talking about yesterday, and the dog barked for the duration of the day. So we must use the word “all” Question 3: Thousands of tourists visit buckingham palace
every week. Now this time, we’re talking about
something that happens regularly. So we used the word “every” Question four.. My father likes red wine, white wine and rosé wine. He likes all wine. So this is an example of an uncountable noun… because we cannot say one wine, two wines, three wines. No, we just say wine and it’s always in the singular. We cannot count wine so we can only use the word “all”. He likes all wine. Question 5… Yesterday, there was a storm. Today, every boat in the port is damaged. So here we are using ….. we can see that the noun is in the
singular form. it’s in the singular… and the verb is singular … so that means we are using the word
“every” because “every” is followed by a noun in the singular form. If we
wanted to use the word “all”, we could have said “Today, all of the boats in the port are damaged. That would also be correct. Question six….. Look at all those birds in the trees so it must be the word all because …. well first of all it’s plural and
second … .. this is …. a demonstrative word. We saw that earlier. Because we are
using the word “those” then we cannot use the word “every”. So we must used the word “all” with
the word “those”. And the last question, question seven …. My sister has borrowed all my CDs … and again … remember the rule we saw earlier. This is a possessive pronoun. This is the word “my”
it’s a possessive pronoun. That means the CDs of me, that belong to
me. So we can only use the word “all”. We must not use the word “every”. So that is the end of the lesson. Thank-you
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